Authors Archives: Gabriel Noah Brahm

The Left at the Moment: An Interview with Michael Bérubé

Part I/Politics in the U.S. Today: What Time is It?

Gabriel Noah Brahm: In early 2009, when The Left at War had just come out, Barack Obama was inaugurated and George W. Bush was finally out of office.  Those were heady days.  The right seemed to be on the run, as you put it in the “Introduction” to your book, which you subtitled “On Time.”  Was the feeling that things were looking up for the left, after eight long years, part of why you there called your book “untimely”?  And if so, have times changed again already, so soon and so quickly?  The book seems very timely, with war still raging and the left still in disarray.[1]

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The Post-Left at War & the Cultural Studies Approach to U.S. Foreign Policy & International Relations

Writing in the pages of Dissent in 2005, noted political scientist Andrei S. Markovits identifies a two-ply composite “litmus test” of left political identity in recent times: knee-jerk opposition to the United States and Israel.  Since 1989/90, as Markovits observes,

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GUEST EDITORS' INTRODUCTION: Toward a Post-Manichean Left

For Christopher Hitchens—the Left at War with Himself

What follows are nine essays inspired by Michael Berube’s book of 2009, The Left at War (NYU Press), prefaced by Nick Cohen’s shot at dealing in brief with some of the same issues, which he takes on at greater length in his book of 2007, What’s Left? (Harper Perennial).  Our interview with Berube was conducted in light of his reading of these pieces, and his own piece—a “response to the responses,” titled “The Left at Bay”—which comes after.

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Herbert Marcuse's 3-Dimensional Hippopotamus: An Interiew with Documentary Filmmaker Alexander Juutilainen

Alexander Juutilainen is the producer/director of the acclaimed documentary Herbert’s Hippopotamus. This video told the story of Herbert Marcuse’s role in student activism while a Professor at the University of California, San Diego and the virulent response of California politicians and residents. Juutilainen was born in Finland and is of Finnish and Greek/Macedonian descent. He grew up primarily in Denmark and moved to San Diego in 1992 where he began the project on Marcuse.

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The Fog of War (You Want Freedom Fries with That?): From 9/11 to Afghanistan & Iraq

Last year, when the chief target of U.S. military might was Afghanistan, and not yet (again) Iraq, we predicted that the response to George W. Bush’s overtly announced plans for what he bluntly termed a “year of war” would be a year of renewed political activism and intensified dissent, both within the United States and around the world, by people who reject the notion that war is normal (P&C 2001:3). We were right. But we never dreamed that in the wake of 9/11, when America might have been expected to glean a certain degree of quotidian good will for its suffering, Bush & Co. would turn the sympathy of the world so far around so quickly, by launching precipitously the kind of unilateral assault now underway against a country that had nothing to do with the infamous attack on New York City.

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Symbolic Capitalism & the Duty to Protect: A Tale of Two Teach-Ins

“This is the reason why men of arms behave with such harshness and folly. Their weapon sinks into an enemy disarmed at their knees; they triumph over a dying man, describing to him the outrages that his body will suffer…. They never guess as they exercise their power, that the consequences of their acts will turn back upon themselves…. War is easy then, and ignobly loved.”–Simone Weil

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